How to Shear a Sheep and Why It’s Important Video

I have been a member of the Livestock Conservancy Organization for years. This year we will be adding some heritage breeds to Solace Farm in support of their work.
Please take a the time to check out this great video they have produced and their website
sheep shearing video banner
The Livestock Conservancy is thrilled to announce the release of our short film, How to Shear Sheep & Why It’s Important. Directed by Jody Shapiro, the compelling 12-minute film showcases the beautiful dance between sheep and shearer, the importance of sheep shearing to the health and well-being of sheep, and the impact that Slow Fashion and local wool have on the economy and local community.
 Watch How to Shear a Sheep & Why video
The film begins with an introduction by Dr. Temple Grandin, award-winning author, animal welfare advocate, and Lifetime Member of The Livestock Conservancy. Throughout the film, viewers willMeet expert shearers and rare breed sheepLearn tips on the best way to shear humanely, including preparing sheep for shearing and best tools for the jobUnderstand why shearing is important for the health of the sheepWatch the art of humane sheep shearingDiscover how you can support a sustainable industry and help save rare sheep breeds from extinction. (Hint – it’s by supporting those that raise them, shear them, and make products from their fiber)We hope that after watching this film, you will feel an appreciation for the art of humane sheep shearing and why it is so vital to the health of sheep. Please watch and share this video with your communities. We need your help spreading the word about why shearing is an important part of conserving rare breeds!
To learn more about our work with rare breeds and why conserving them is important for maintaining biodiversity and food security, visit our website at https://livestockconservancy.org/.

Thank you to Isabella Rossellini, Executive Producer of the film and Ambassador for The Livestock Conservancy for her generous gift that made this project possible. 
 ###The Livestock Conservancy is a national non-profit membership organization working to protect more than 150 breeds of livestock and poultry from extinction.

Shave ‘Em to Save ‘Em Initiative
Interested in helping save rare breed sheep from extinction? Want to support shearers, shepherds, and the slow fashion movement? Sign up as a Fiber Artist to craft for a cause. This initiative encourages knitters, spinners, weavers, felters, and other crafters to use fiber from rare breed sheep in their projects. Using their wool puts sheep back to work on farms across the U.S. Enroll online at https://livestockconservancy.org/get-involved/shave-em-to-save-em/

Why is genetic diversity important?Like all ecological systems, agriculture depends on genetic diversity to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Genetic diversity in domestic animals is revealed in distinct breeds, each with different characteristics and uses. Traditional, historic breeds retain essential attributes for survival and self-sufficiency – fertility, foraging ability, longevity, maternal instincts and resistance to disease and parasites. As agriculture changes, this genetic diversity may be needed for a broad range of uses and opportunities. Once lost, genetic diversity is gone forever.What are Heritage Breeds?Heritage breeds are livestock and poultry breeds raised by our forefathers. These breeds were carefully selected and bred over time to develop traits that made them well-adapted to the local environment and they thrived under farming practices and cultural conditions that are very different from those found in modern agriculture.Heritage animals once roamed America’s pastoral landscape, but today these breeds are in danger of extinction. Modern agriculture has changed, causing many of these breeds to fall out of favor. Heritage breeds store a wealth of genetic resources that are important for our future and the future of our agricultural food system.

Great Resource for Shepherd and Goatherders!

From Melinda Ellison

Hi all, I’m the Extension Sheep Specialist with the University of Idaho. Myself and a team of sheep and goat specialists from Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah have teamed up to host a monthly sheep and goat webinar series, where we invite other experts to present on time-relevant topics. I’d like to invite you all to join us for our next one on Wednesday, February 9, 2022. Register here: [https://uidaho.zoom.us/…/regi…/WN_fWiLWKvuS2-dx3AJnWotNw](https://uidaho.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fWiLWKvuS2-dx3AJnWotNw?fbclid=IwAR0fRlu_IZA_V6JJhuFQ6TfafhIW43ivpOzl9MAOoZTVqY9ZrhMfvXJLROk)

We have also posted all of our past webinars to our YouTube channel, so please check us out! [https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGrmjYNXPVwf-V-VeZYfFnQ](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGrmjYNXPVwf-V-VeZYfFnQ?fbclid=IwAR3hnaZXicMGWtvGO5t01xOKMUzvh96Gk30UF5WPj1VrlLik-REdARNgGGw)

Encouragement is Essential

I am passionate about Farming and often feel I should spend less time talking and writing about it .

Summer Chores

I have to remind myself why I go beyond living the farm life to sharing it. The following is a note I recieved:

” You were one of the people who helped me keep pushing the first time. When you told me that it takes at least 5 years to feel like you have something started. And you were right!

Unfortunately I lost most of what we had built but, God is so good and we have a second opportunity to do it again and better with more knowledge, wisdom and much better teamwork!

I keep hearing your words, 5 years, just keep going! ❤️

Thank you for your words of encouragement” -Rebecca Cummins

I love to hear of your challenges and successes!

Summer Mornings on Solace Farm

Just thought I would share my morning …

…I am sitting in the warmth of the morning sun on my porch swing watching the dew drops glisten like stars on the vibrant green grass. A gentle breeze causes the verdant stalks to tremble every now and then as though shimmering in the ecstasy of birdsong that fills the air. It is these quiet moments that make the days glide by in spite of the hours of weeding and haying.

Life is good.

Small Garden
Small Gardens Produce Big Results

Integrated Parasite Management Strategies for Sheep Producers

Webinar to Address Parasite Management   is the topic for the next American Sheep Industry Association-sponsored webinar. Dr. Andrew Weaver of North Carolina State University will lead the webinar on Tuesday at 8 p.m. eastern time.    “Parasites continue to be a significant challenge for sheep production across the country. The failure of dewormers to adequately treat parasite infections has resulted in the need for alternative parasite management strategies. Unfortunately, there is no single cure. Rather, an integrated approach is needed where multiple strategies are implemented for effective parasite control,” reads the webinar description.   “These strategies can include environment-based approaches as well as animal-based approaches. In this webinar, parasite biology and host-parasite interactions will be highlighted to provide context for parasite management. Discussion will follow on various parasite management strategies available and how they can be implemented in a sheep production system. A multifaceted approach to parasite management will be most successful in mitigating infection levels and improving sheep performance and well-being.”
Register for the Webinar

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